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Windows 8 Pro

Windows 8 is a personal computer operating system that was produced by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems. The operating system was released to manufacturing on August 1, 2012, with general availability on October 26, 2012

Pro is the edition of Windows 8 for the PC enthusiast, and business/technical professionals.

It includes everything found in 8 plus features like BitLocker encryption, PC virtualization, domain connectivity, and PC management. It’s what you’d expect from Windows if you’re a heavy-duty user or operating in a business environment.

  • Familiar Desktop
  • Own Unique Start Screen
  • Works Hard and Play Hard
  • Built-in Apps for Email, People, Photos, Video Editing
  • Experience Office at its Best on Windows 8 Devises
  • Discover New and Better Ways to Create

System Requirements:

Component Minimum Recommended
Processor GHz clock rate
IA-32 or x64 architecture
Support for PAENX, and SSE2[119][120]
x64 architecture
Second Level Address Translation (SLAT) support for Hyper-V
Memory (RAM) IA-32 edition: 1 GB
x64 edition: 2 GB
GB
Graphics Card DirectX 9 graphics device
WDDM 1.0 or higher driver
DirectX 10 graphics device
Display screen N/A 1024×768 pixels
Input device Keyboard and mouse multi-touch display screen
Hard disk space IA-32 edition: 16 GB
x64 edition: 20 GB
N/A
Other N/A UEFI v2.3.1 Errata B with Microsoft Windows Certification Authority in its database
Trusted Platform Module (TPM)
Internet connectivity

 

Safety and Security:

New security features in Windows 8 include two new authentication methods tailored towards touchscreens (PINs and picture passwords), the addition of antivirus capabilities to Windows Defender (bringing it in parity with Microsoft Security Essentials). Smart Screen filtering integrated into Windows, Family Safety offers Parental controls, which allows parents to monitor and manage their children’s activities on a device with activity reports and safety controls. Windows 8 also provides integrated system recovery through the new “Refresh” and “Reset” functions, including system recovery from the USB drive. Windows 8’s first security patches would be released on November 13, 2012; it would contain three fixes deemed “critical” by the company.

Windows 8 supports a feature of the UEFI specification known as “Secure boot”, which uses a public-key infrastructure to verify the integrity of the operating system and prevent unauthorized programs such as rootkits from infecting the device’s boot process. Some pre-built devices may be described as “certified” by Microsoft; these must have secure boot enabled by default, and provide ways for users to disable or re-configure the feature. ARM-based Windows RT devices must have secure boot permanently enabled.

Online Services and Functionality:

Windows 8 provides heavier integration with online services from Microsoft and others. A user can now log into Windows with a Microsoft account, which can be used to access services and synchronize applications and settings between devices. Windows 8 also ships with a client app for Microsoft’s SkyDrive cloud storage service, which also allows apps to save files directly to SkyDrive. A SkyDrive client for the desktop and File Explorer are not included in Windows 8 and must be downloaded separately. Bundled multimedia apps are provided under the Xbox brand, including Xbox Music, Xbox Video, and the Xbox SmartGlass companion for use with an Xbox 360 console. Games can integrate into an Xbox Live hub app, which also allows users to view their profile and gamerscore. Other bundled apps provide the ability to link Flickr and Facebook. Due to Facebook Connect service changes, Facebook support is disabled in all bundled apps effective June 8, 2015.

 

Internet Explorer 10 is included as both a desktop program and a touch-optimized app and includes increased support for HTML5, CSS3, and hardware acceleration. The Internet Explorer app does not support plugins or ActiveX components but includes a version of Adobe Flash Player that is optimized for touch and low power usage. Initially, Adobe Flash would only work on sites included on a “Compatibility View” whitelist; however, after feedback from users and additional compatibility tests, an update in March 2013 changed this behavior to use a smaller blacklist of sites with known compatibility issues instead, allowing Flash to be used on most sites by default. The desktop version does not contain these limitations.

Windows 8 also incorporates improved support for mobile broadband; the operating system can now detect the insertion of a SIM card and automatically configure connection settings (including APNs and carrier branding), and reduce its Internet usage in order to conserve bandwidth on metered networks. Windows 8 also adds an integrated airplane mode setting to globally disable all wireless connectivity as well. Carriers can also offer account management systems through Windows Store apps, which can be automatically installed as a part of the connection process and offer usage statistics on their respective tile.

Interface and Desktop:

Windows 8 introduces significant changes to the operating system’s user interface, many of which are aimed at improving its experience on tablet computers and other touchscreen devices. The new user interface is based on Microsoft’s Metro design languages and uses a Start screen similar to that of Windows Phone 7 as the primary means of launching applications. The Start screen displays a customizable array of tiles linking to various apps and desktop programs, some of which can display constantly updated information and content through “live tiles”. As a form of multi-tasking, apps can be snapped to the side of a screen. Alongside the traditional Control Panel, a new simplified and touch-optimized settings app known as “PC Settings” is used for basic configuration and user settings. It does not include many of the advanced options still accessible from the normal Control Panel.

A vertical toolbar known as the charms (accessed by swiping from the right edge of a touchscreen, or pointing the cursor at hotspots in the right corners of a screen) provides access to the system and app-related functions, such as search, sharing, device management, settings, and a Start button. The traditional desktop environment for running desktop applications is accessed via a tile on the Start screen. The Start button on the taskbar from previous versions of Windows has been converted into a hotspot in the lower-left corner of the screen, which displays a large tooltip displaying a thumbnail of the Start screen. However, Windows 8.1 added the start button back to the taskbar after many complaints. Swiping from the left edge of a touchscreen or clicking in the top-left corner of the screen allows one to switch between apps and Desktop. Pointing the cursor in the top-left corner of the screen and moving down reveals a thumbnail list of active apps. Aside from the removal of the Start button and the replacement of the Aero Glass theme with a flatter and solid-colored design, the desktop interface on Windows 8 is similar to that of Windows 7.

Removed Features:

Several notable features have been removed in Windows 8; support for playing DVD-Video was removed from Windows Media Player due to the cost of licensing the necessary decoders (especially for devices which do not include optical disc drives at all) and the prevalence of online streaming services. For the same reasons, Windows Media Center is not included by default on Windows 8, but Windows Media Center and DVD playback support can be purchased in the “Pro Pack” (which upgrades the system to Windows 8 Pro) or “Media Center Pack” add-on for Windows 8 Pro. As with prior versions, third-party DVD player software can still be used to enable DVD playback.

Backup and Restore the backup component of Windows, is deprecated. It still ships with Windows 8 and continues to work on preset schedules, but is pushed to the background and can only be accessed through a Control Panel applet called “Windows 7 File Recovery”. Shadow Copy, a component of Windows Explorer that once saved previous versions of changed files, no longer protects local files and folders. It can only access previous versions of shared files stored on a Windows Server computer. The subsystem on which these components worked, however, is still available for other software to use.